Doro 8050 review Android for the advanced in age

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Trying to master an elderly relative on a modern smartphone is difficult. I once thought of my 80-year-old mother as a simple guide to a large-screen Android phone, and finally asked, “So how do you call it a driver?” My torn screen, launcher, swipe, disk, files and applications all went into his mind.

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Read further: The best phone for the elderly

Keeping this extraordinary circumstance in mind, Toro – an Android smartphone manufacturer that specializes in making phones for older citizens – is designed to be a little more distracting with the user interface, and aimed at protecting vulnerable people With little hardware features.

Toro 8050 Review: What You Need to Know
This is not the first time Toro has tried to offer Android to the elderly. Back in 2019, we tried the Toro 8035 and ran out of it completely.

The new Toro 8050 has all the hallmarks of getting more acclaim. Senior-centric features include a customizable user interface with the help of Google Assistant, and Toro’s personal response button on the back of the handset – and more.

Those prices have reversed the Toro 8050 with fierce competition, not least Xiaomi’s Redmi Note 9D, which currently wears the crown as the best budget handset in the market and is priced at $ 180. Notable are the Samsung Galaxy A21s (145), Moto G9 Power (£ 190).

In that note, these phones include 5G connectivity, NFC support or a fingerprint reader for the same money. Toro does not have all this, but none of its competitors have designed it with this in mind. From that point of view, at least, there is a market for Toro, which is almost wholly owned.

Read further: Take great shots with the best smartphone cameras

Toro 8050 Review: Design and Key Features
Physically, the 8050 is a traditional, otherwise curved phone with chunky bezels at the top and bottom of the screen. In both size and aspect ratio, it is similar in dimensions to the iPhone 8 Plus, measuring 152 x 70 x 9 mm and weighing 165 grams. The polycarbonate body of the Toro is easy to handle and does not look like the glass is slippery on hand compared to the competitors.

The default home button that sits below the screen may look a bit outdated, but it is suitable for new Android users. It is so large that it can be easily touched, and it will take you back to the home screen, no matter how many apps you open.

Elsewhere, the phone charges via a USB-C port at the bottom, and has separate buttons on the left and a power button on the right. The SIM / MicroSD tray can be easily unlocked without the usual use of inserted SIM poker and can be accessed with your fingernails instead. The 3.5mm audio jack can be seen above.

Take a look at the rear camera below and you will see the Toro 8050’s exclusive “Answer” button, which is one of the key points of the phone.

To do this, you have to install Toro’s Answer app on another device and connect both. This & # 39; It is best to contact you now with a long push of the answer button (or three quick presses), which sends alerts and location details to the connected device via Google Maps. Once the recipient recognizes the alert, a hands-free call is established between the two handsets.

Toro 8050 Review: Visual and Audio
Thanks to the fact that the Toro 8050 screen measures only 5.45 on the diagonal, as even the normal stiffness of the joints or joints can be done by showing a slight problem to adults.

The 1,440 x 720 resolution IPS display has a good pixel density of 298 bp and an SRGP range of 82.7%. However, with the measured Delta E285, color accuracy is somewhat off, but with a maximum brightness of at least 501 / CDM2, the phone is much brighter. The contrast ratio of 1,318: 1 of the phone is not too bad.

Like most Android phones, the Toro 8050 is compatible with hearing aids and has a HAC rating of M3 / T3. Call quality is good with many sizes from earpieces, and has loud speakers that are hard to hear.

Toro 8050 Review: Software
The Toro 8050 runs Android 9 with a greatly modified interface. The most important feature is “Eva”, Toro’s own software overlay, which combines functions commonly used under the selection of action-based icons; Call, view, send, add, search, help and set.

As an example of how this works, tap on the “Add” icon, and the submenu provides additional options such as adding contacts, notes, alarms, events, or apps. Alternatively, tap on “Notes” and open or tap the Google Keep “app” to launch the Play Store. This is a clear attempt to make the Android interface work based on simple title commands and it works well.

Beyond Eva, the entire boot is designed with simplicity and ease of use, a thoughtful series of tutorials, and easy access to various settings. Access the phone.

Toro 8050 Review: Performance and Battery Life
The combination of a quad core 1.3GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 215 processor and 2GB of RAM is sufficient to complete the basics at a reasonable speed. In everyday use, the 8050 never felt wider or slower, even though it was nowhere near the fastest phone we’ve tested.

Toro 8050 Review: Performance and Battery Life
The combination of a quad core 1.3GHz Qualcomm Snapdragon 215 processor and 2GB of RAM is sufficient to complete the basics at a reasonable speed. In everyday use, the 8050 never felt wider or slower, even though it was nowhere near the fastest phone we’ve tested.

Toro 8050 Review: Camera
The Toro has a simple 13MP camera at the rear and a 5MP selfie snapper at the front. The front camera works well when making video calls and can record full HD (1080p) video at 30fps.

With the inability to accurately determine the output of any scene, the rear camera is not very pleasant. For example, take a photo of the strong sunlight and the sky will explode completely.

The image detail is adequate, minimal, and the camera focuses sharply. However, digital zoom is best avoided: any magnification of more than 2x will result in a visually unattractive image, and the camera will cease to be used.